Limitless Review

There are some movies you enjoy watching, and then there are movies that you may not have enjoyed, but are glad that you watched. Limitless (2011) is a movie that I enjoyed every minute of, like eating a large basket of fried food, but the minute it was done I felt sick. It is the perfect example of cotton candy fluff that Hollywood is producing, all flavor and no substance. Even worse than being empty, the main idiom of Limitless is a damaging one to internalize.

Eddie Morra, the main character of the film, is down on his luck. He has been waiting for inspiration to hit, so he can get over his writers block and finish a book. He happens across an old friend, who introduces him to a miracle drug. After taking the drug, you are suddenly using 100% of your brain power, rather than the 20% that we reportedly use. Basically, it allows you to become a super hero. The one drawback? The more you take the drug, the worse the withdrawals will be. The main driving force behind the plot line in this film is a drug addict trying to assure his next fix.

The problem with this concept is that it only solidifies the overbearing belief in America that we need only to wait, and our shot at the “big time” will come. There is no success through hard work and dedication, only from luck of the draw. Eddie was lucky to be introduced to this drug, and never once achieves anything without it.

This is what film, broadcast, and magazines are teaching us. We watch these amazing stories of people who achieve great things, and maybe someday it can happen to you! But until it does, why not keep watching our stories. You’ll have time to live your own later.

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About Skwalin

Web Developer and Designer by trade. Gamer and Internet Seeker by night.

Posted on December 9, 2011, in Movie Review and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Well said good sir. I agree enthusiastically with your critical view of the film. It is disappointing the underline messages being put forth by such an influential media. Also, I totally dig “How TV Ruined Aspiration.”

  2. Thank you Zach!

    I don’t necessarily feel that all forms of media need to have a good underlying message, but I am always saddened when a film has a poor or damaging message.

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